Random Hole Display Left 90

Novel Displays

Ye Pan, Will Step­toe and Anthony Steed

Random Hole Display

We intro­duce a multi-view auto­ste­reo­scop­ic tele­p­res­ence dis­play and its asso­ci­ated view-depended ray traced ren­der­ing meth­ods. Our new sys­tem is inspired by the “Ran­dom Hole Dis­play” design  that mod­i­fied the pat­tern of open­ings in a bar­ri­er moun­ted in front of a flat pan­el dis­play from thin slits to a dense pat­tern of tiny, pseudo-ran­domly placed holes. This allows view­ers any­where in front of the dis­play to see a dif­fer­ent sub­set of the display’s nat­ive pixels through the ran­dom-hole screen.

Multiview Display

Gaze, atten­tion, and eye con­tact are import­ant aspects of face to face com­mu­nic­a­tion, but some sub­tleties can be lost in video­con­fer­en­cing because par­ti­cipants look at a single planar image of the remote user. We pro­pose a low-cost cyl­indric­al video con­fer­en­cing sys­tem that pre­serves gaze dir­ec­tion by provid­ing per­spect­ive-cor­rect images for mul­tiple view­points around a con­fer­ence table. We accom­plish this by using an array of cam­er­as to cap­ture a remote per­son, and an array of pro­ject­ors to present the cam­era images onto a cyl­indric­al screen. The cyl­indric­al screen reflects each image to a nar­row view­ing zone. The use of such a situ­ated dis­play allows par­ti­cipants to see the remote per­son from mul­tiple view­ing dir­ec­tions. We com­pare our sys­tem to three altern­at­ive dis­play con­fig­ur­a­tions. We demon­strate the effect­ive­ness of our sys­tem by show­ing it allows mul­tiple par­ti­cipants to sim­ul­tan­eously tell where the remote per­son is pla­cing their gaze.

A Gaze-preserving Situated Multiview Telepresence System

Ye Pan and Anthony Steed

 @inproceedings{pan2014gaze,
  title={A gaze-preserving situated multiview telepresence system},
  author={Pan, Ye and Steed, Anthony},
  booktitle={Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems},
  pages={2173--2176},
  year={2014},
  organization={ACM}
} 

Sphere Avatar Display

We report on two exper­i­ments that invest­ig­ate the influ­ence of dis­play type and view­ing angle on how people place their trust dur­ing avatar-medi­ated inter­ac­tion. By mon­it­or­ing advice seek­ing beha­vi­or, our first exper­i­ment demon­strates that if par­ti­cipants observe an avatar at an oblique view­ing angle on a flat dis­play, they are less able to dis­crim­in­ate between expert and non-expert advice than if they observe the avatar face-on. We then intro­duce a nov­el spher­ic­al dis­play and a ray-traced ren­der­ing tech­nique that can dis­play an avatar that can be seen cor­rectly from any view­ing dir­ec­tion. We expect that a spher­ic­al dis­play has advant­ages over a flat dis­play because it bet­ter sup­ports non-verbal cues, par­tic­u­larly gaze dir­ec­tion, since it presents a clear and undis­tor­ted view­ing aspect at all angles. Our second exper­i­ment com­pares the spher­ic­al dis­play to a flat dis­play. Whilst par­ti­cipants can dis­crim­in­ate expert advice regard­less of dis­play, a neg­at­ive bias towards the flat screen emerges at oblique view­ing angles. This res­ult emphas­izes the abil­ity of the spher­ic­al dis­play to be viewed qual­it­at­ively sim­il­arly from all angles. Togeth­er the exper­i­ments demon­strate how trust can be altered depend­ing on how one views the avatar.

Comparing Flat and Spherical Displays in a Trust Scenario in Avatar-Mediated Interaction

Ye Pan, Wil­li­am Step­toe and Anthony Steed

 @inproceedings{pan2014comparing,
  title={Comparing flat and spherical displays in a trust scenario in avatar-mediated interaction},
  author={Pan, Ye and Steptoe, William and Steed, Anthony},
  booktitle={Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems},
  pages={1397--1406},
  year={2014},
  organization={ACM}
} 

Sphere Video Display

The move­ment of human gaze is very import­ant in a face to face con­ver­sa­tion. Some of the qual­ity of that move­ment is lost in video con­fer­en­cing because the par­ti­cipants look at a single planar image of the remote per­son. We use an array of cam­er­as to cap­ture a remote user, and then dis­play video of that per­son on a spher­ic­al dis­play. We com­pare the spher­ic­al dis­play to a face to face set­ting and a planar dis­play. We demon­strate the effect­ive­ness of the cam­era array and spher­ic­al dis­play sys­tem in that it allows observ­ers to accur­ately judge where the remote user is pla­cing their gaze.

Preserving Gaze Direction in Teleconferencing using a Camera Array and a Spherical Display

Ye Pan and Anthony Steed

 @inproceedings{pan2012preserving,
  title={Preserving gaze direction in teleconferencing using a camera array and a spherical display},
  author={Pan, Ye and Steed, Anthony},
  booktitle={3DTV-Conference: The True Vision-Capture, Transmission and Display of 3D Video (3DTV-CON), 2012},
  pages={1--4},
  year={2012},
  organization={IEEE}
}